Air Force Research Laboratory Receives Top Technology Transfer Award

KIRTLAND AFB-Air Force Research Laboratory New Mexico  is pleased to announce that one of its technologies, and the scientists and engineers who developed it, is being honored with one of the nation’s top technology transfer awards. The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer (FLC) recently selected AFRL to receive one of its 2016 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards.

 Dr. Paul Hausgen demonstrates deploying the composite Roll-Out Solar Array slit-tube boom. The booms do not require external power, but deploy under their own stored strain energy.  

 Dr. Paul Hausgen demonstrates deploying the composite Roll-Out Solar Array slit-tube boom. The booms do not require external power, but deploy under their own stored strain energy.

 

The technology, the Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA), is revolutionizing how satellites are powered and is being embraced by both government and commercial customers. For the past four decades, satellites have relied on their power from rigid, heavy solar arrays that require cumbersome mechanics for deployment once in space. ROSA is a lighter-weight, flexible array that stows compactly that unfurls in space using a rollable high-strain composite tube.

By eliminating the need for the complex, expensive and heavy components used on traditional panels, ROSA makes satellites much more cost efficient. ROSA can also provide significantly more power than traditional panels because it can easily be scaled larger for more capacity.

It is estimated ROSA’s technology advancements could save the U.S. Air Force’s communication and navigation programs $1.4 billion.   

“ROSA is a wonderful example of revolutionary in-house AFRL research being linked to the energetic, product-focused nature of small business to produce a remarkable cost savings for our nation’s space assets,” said Dr. Jeremy Banik, ROSA’s Principle Investigator.

AFRL was selected for the FLC award for its outstanding work in transferring the ROSA technology into the private sector for commercial applications. Two companies, Deployable Space Systems (DSS), Inc. located in Goleta, CA and LoadPath, LLC located in Albuquerque, NM worked with AFRL to advance the technology and get it into the market.

The ROSA team will be honored at an award ceremony on Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at the FLC National Meeting in Chicago. They include: 1st Lt. Nathan Gapp, Dr. David Chapman, Dr. Jeremy Banik, Joy Stein, Dr. Bernard Carpenter, and Dr. Paul Hausgen.

MORE ABOUT ROSA:

The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) utilizes advanced, high-efficiency solar cell technology coupled with high-strain deployable composite booms to drastically improve spacecraft power generation.  The carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite booms that are passively deployed using stored strain energy in the composite laminate layup.  The result is a very efficient, lower cost structural system that provides 3x reduction in mass, 4x increase in stiffness, and 6x decrease in stowed volume compared to traditional rigid panel solar arrays. 

MORE ABOUT THE FLC AWARDS:

The FLC Awards Program annually recognizes federal laboratories and their industry partners for outstanding technology transfer efforts.  Since 1984, the FLC has recognized honorees at nearly 200 federal laboratories. These awards have become one of the most prestigious honors in technology transfer. For more details, go www.federallabs.org.

KIRTLAND AFB-Air Force Research Laboratory New Mexico  is pleased to announce that one of its technologies, and the scientists and engineers who developed it, is being honored with one of the nation’s top technology transfer awards. The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer (FLC) recently selected AFRL to receive one of its 2016 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards.